Sick of Your Boss? Try The Night Shift

There are day walkers, and there are night owls. Some folks love a good cup of coffee first thing in the morning, while others prefer waking up at the crack of 6 pm and going to work when everyone else settling down for dinner. 

The graveyard shift isn’t for everyone, though. It can take a toll on your health if you’re not adequately sleeping and keeping a consistent schedule. Some people, though, they’re just vampires. Back in 2013 study from Brigham & Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, around 8.6 million Americans work the night shift.

What are the reasons some folks just don’t want to deal with the daylight? When you work in the daytime, there’s always somewhere to get lunch, there’s still a spot for an after-work drink. Getting off at 7 am, there’s a lot of breakfast options, but not exactly a ton of bars if you need a bottle of Miller Lite after a long night.

One of the most obvious reasons people prefer the night shift? 

 

The money is way better

Working the night shift typically always pays better because most people would prefer to have a 9-5 schedule. Because of this, a lot of companies offer pay bumps for employees willing to work overnight. Some make 10-20 percent higher wages because they’re eager to come in and pull the overnight hours. If you’re making an extra $7 an hour, on top of the base pay, those extra dollars add up real quick. 

 

No suits 

One of the best parts of working the night shift is greater autonomy. By the time the night crew rolls in, the bosses are long gone. Because the crews are smaller, there are more chances to show that a worker can hold down the fort without managers being around to supervise.

There are also fewer people, and more downtime rather than the day shift where the foot traffic is typically much higher – except at a Waffle House, everyone goes in there at 2 am.

 

There’s room to experiment 

As long as you’re not working in an ICU unit, working the graveyard shift has its perks. For folks who like to try new systems out, to figure out new ways to do things, the night is a perfect time because no one is around. If an overnight stocker sees a variable in how the shelves are filled, this could be the time to change how the actual work is getting done. If there’s great success, the boss can find out. If it’s a work in progress, there’s that sweet, sweet autonomy again. 

 

There’s less work 

Well, sometimes. A lot of the night shift is maintaining rather than pushing forward new business. Think about a security guard: during the day, they’re checking id’s making the rounds, doing stuff. The guy working the desk during the night isn’t opening the door for anyone without proper credentials.

Scheduling is easier 

If kids are in the mix, one of the parents working the night shift can make sense. While it’s nice to have both parents around all of the time, the night shift provides an answer around childcare and affordability. For creatives, this also works because the hours can be flexible enough that things can get moved around to accommodate projects and events.

 

Peace and quiet 

Less people work the night shift, so there are fewer chances to make awkward small talk. Plus, if the job requires laser focus and fewer people are around, that’s one less hurdle in the face of concentration.

 

Vitality is omnipresent 

This one goes out to the nurses working the graveyard shift. Being in the hospital is scary. But, some nurses work in the middle of the night, saving lives, doing the best they can while everyone else is asleep. But those same nurses are there to be a caretaker when patients are all alone in a bed that’s not theirs, in a place that for many is frightening. Being those caring givers should be saluted and play an absolutely vital role in the success of the hospital. 

If you’re thinking of trying out the night shift, just prepare your body, get some sleep, and turn on the coffee pot. What isn’t possible for some, may be the perfect routine for you. 

Like this article? Check out the rest of the Adia blog. There’s a little something for everyone. 



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